Tough Guise: Violence, Media, and the Crisis in Masculinity, Long Beach, CA


Contact Name: Jackson Katz
Phone Number: (562) 997-3953
E-mail: jacksonkatz@aol.com
Website: http://www.jacksonkatz.com
Key Words: (1) Mixed gender and male only; (2) high school and college age and adults; (3) racially diverse; (4) university, school, and community settings; (5) video and study guide; (6) multiple sessions or one-time presentation
Population served
This resource tool was developed for high school and college students. It is also frequently used in batterer interventions, domestic violence and sexual assault outreach programs, and other community settings.
Medium used to convey message
“Tough Guise: Violence, Media, and the Crisis in Masculinity” is an educational video that is used in conjunction with a 22-page study guide. There is a high school version of the video that is 57 minutes long and a college version that is 82 minutes long. The video and guide are used by numerous schools and agencies throughout the country and are often structured with multiple sessions. Information for these items are available on Mr. Katz’s web site.
Goals, objectives, and desired outcomes
This program provides an analysis of the relationship between mass media, masculinity, and violence. The goals include increasing awareness of media’s influence in perpetuating the cultural norm of masculinity and violence and providing participants with analytic tools to understand how media works.
Theoretical/ scientific basis for the approach
This program is grounded in prior research that illustrates the influence of media on social norms.
Level of evaluation
There have been varying levels of evaluation by the various agencies and schools that use the program throughout the country. The majority of evaluation has been limited to basic pre- and post-testing.
Staff capacity
Mr. Katz provides the video and study guide on his web site, along with other resource tools such as the videos “Wrestling with Manhood” and “Spin the Bottle.” Mr. Katz also helped develop the Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) program, and he tours the country discussing issues of masculinity and violence.