Stalking is defined by the National Center for Victims of Crime Stalking Resource Center as "a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would case a reasonable person to feel fear."

Some examples of stalking behaviors include:
  • Following the victim
  • Sending him/her unwanted gifts
  • Sending unwanted correspondence
  • Monitoring the victim's phone calls or computer usage
  • Driving by the victim's home/school/work
  • Damaging personal property
  • Tracking the victim with GPS
  • Threatening to hurt the victim or the victim's family/friends/animals
  • Spreading rumors about the victim


The 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey published by the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control of the Centers for DIsease Control and Prevention reported statistics on stalking in the U.S. as follows:
  • 1 in 6 women has been stalked at some point in her lifetime and believed that she or someone close to her would be harmed or killed.
  • 1 in 19 men has experienced stalking that left him feeling fearful that him or someone close to him would be harmed or killed.
  • 78.8% of female victims who reported being stalked received unwanted phone calls. 57.6% were approached by the stalker
  • 66.2% of female victims were stalked by a current or former intimate partner, while 24% were stalked by an acquaintance.
  • 41.4% of male victims were stalked by a current or former intimate partner, while 40% were stalked by an acquaintance.
  • 75.9% of male victims received unwanted phone call, hangups, or text messages
  • 50% percent of female victims and more than 30% of male victims were stalked before age 25.

Stalking awareness month is held in January. Read the CALCASA blog about it here and here (the second link includes a link to a webinar on the topic)

The Connection Between Stalking and Sexual Assault

Resources: