Campus SaVE Act

The Campus SaVE Act was signed into law in 2013 by President Obama as part of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) Reauthorization. The Campus SaVE Act amends the Clery Act, which addresses campus sexual assault policies within the Higher Education Act of 1965.

Campus SaVE Act Definitions:

Programs to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking: (1) Comprehensive, intentional, and integrated programming, initiatives, strategies, and campaigns intended to end dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking that–
(i) Are culturally relevant, inclusive of diverse communities and identities, sustainable, responsive to community needs, and informed by research or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome; and
(ii) Consider environmental risk and protective factors as they occur on the individual, relationship, institutional, community and societal levels.
(2) Programs to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking include both primary prevention and awareness programs directed at incoming students and new employees and ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns directed at students and employees, as defined in paragraph (j)(2).
(j) Programs to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. As required by paragraph (b)(11) of this section, an institution must include in its annual security report a statement of policy that addresses the institution’s programs to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking.
(1) The statement must include–
(i) A description of the institution’s primary prevention and awareness programs for all incoming students and new employees, which must include–
(A) A statement that the institution prohibits the crimes of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking;
(B) The definition of “dating violence,” “domestic violence,” “sexual assault,” and “stalking” in the applicable jurisdiction;
(C) The definition of “consent,” in reference to sexual activity, in the applicable jurisdiction;
(D) A description of safe and positive options for bystander intervention;
(E) Information on risk reduction; and
(F) The information described in paragraphs (b)(11) and (k)(2).
(ii) A description of the institution’s ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns for students and employees, including information described in paragraph (j)(1)(i)(A) through (j)(1)(i)(F).
(2) For the purposes of this paragraph-–
(i) Awareness programs means community-wide or audience-specific programming, initiatives, and strategies that increase audience knowledge and share information and resources to prevent violence, promote safety, and reduce perpetration.
(ii) Bystander intervention means safe and positive options that may be carried out by an individual or individualsto prevent harm or intervene when there is a risk of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking. Bystander intervention includes recognizing situations of potential harm, understanding institutional structures and cultural conditions that facilitate violence, overcoming barriers to intervening, identifying safe and effective intervention options, and taking action to intervene.
(iii) Ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns means programming, initiatives, and strategies that are sustained over time and focus on increasing understanding of topics relevant to and skills for addressing dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking, using a range of strategies with audiences throughout the institution and including information described in paragraph (j)(1)(i)(A) through (j)(1)(i)(F).
(iv) Primary prevention programs means programming, initiatives, and strategies informed by research or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome that are intended to stop dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking before they occur through the promotion of positive and healthy behaviors that foster healthy, mutually respectful relationships and sexuality, encourage safe bystander intervention, and seek to change behavior and social norms in healthy and safe directions.
(v) Risk reduction means options designed to decrease perpetration and bystander inaction, and to increase empowerment for victims in order to promote safety and to help individuals and communities address conditions that facilitate violence.
(3) An institution’s programs to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking must include, at a minimum, the information described in paragraph (j)(1) of this section.

Source: Violence Against Women Act, Federal Register, Vol. 79, No. 202, October 20, 2014 / Rules and Regulations 62788